2021 March

March 24: Facts & Historical Events On This Day

Facts & Historic Events That Happened on March 24

March 24th is officially Flatmate’s Day and Tuberculosis Day.

Today marks day 83 of the year, and we have 282 days left of the year.

For those of you who were born on March 24th, your zodiac sign is Aries.

You’re about to discover some of the most incredible historical events that all happened on this very day, including discoveries, new technologies, disasters and so much more.

Did you know that on this day in 1837, black citizens were given the right to vote in Canada? Unfortunately, racial discrimination meant their exercising of this right was initially impeded.

Keep reading for more facts about March 24th in history!

What Happened On March 24 In History?

2017

560 people dressed as ghosts to get a world record for the largest gathering of people dressed as ghosts.

This was achieved by Mercy School Mounthawk in Tralee, Ireland to highlight the invisibility of arthritis.
2010

Craig David was appointed as Goodwill Ambassador against tuberculosis (TB) by the World Health Organization.

The choice came after the singer sold more than 13 million albums worldwide to help fund the fight against TB.
2005

The Office, created by Ricky Gervais in the UK, aired its first US season on NBC.

1987

The first Soul Train Music Awards took place in Santa Monica, California, US.

Winners included Janet Jackson, Run-DMC, Cameo, and Gregory Abbott.
1958

Elvis Presley enlisted in the US army.

OTD in 1958: Elvis Presley enlisted in the US army.
1900

The Rapid Transit Railroad broke ground on a new underground subway to link Manhattan and Brooklyn.

New York City Mayor Robert Anderson Van Wyck led the groundbreaking ceremony.
1883

The first telephone call was made between New York and Chicago.

1882

Dr. Robert Koch discovered Mycobacterium Tuberculosis which is bacteria that causes tuberculosis (TB).

OTD in 1882: Dr. Robert Koch discovered Mycobacterium Tuberculosis which is bacteria that causes tuberculosis (TB).
At this time in history, TB killed 1 in every 7 people in the US and Europe and Koch's find went on to help control the disease.
Source CDC
1853

The Provincial Freeman Anti-slavery newspaper was first published in Ontario, Canada.

The publisher, Mary Ann Shadd Cary, became the first black female publisher in North America.
1837

Black citizens were given the right to vote in Canada.