2021 March

March 17: Facts & Historical Events On This Day

Facts & Historic Events That Happened on March 17

Happy St Patrick’s Day! March 17th is National Corned Beef and Cabbage Day & Submarine Day.

Welcome to the 76th day of the year! We’re gradually getting through the year, but we still have another 289 days until we reach the new year.

Everyone who was born on March 17th shares the zodiac sign of Pisces.

If this day means something to you then you’ll want to know all the things that happened this day in history. Here we have some interesting events from history and so much more!

Did you know that on this day in 1908, the quickest boxing match in history took place? Tommy Burns knocked out Jem Roche in just 88 seconds.

Keep reading for more facts about March 17th in history!

What Happened On March 17 In History?

2014

Pop singer-songwriter Sia released her hit single “Chandelier”.

The single reached the top 5 on record charts in 20 countries including France, Poland, Norway, Australia & New Zealand.
1995

The FDA approved the first chicken pox vaccine.

Source AP News
1973

London Bridge, designed by Lord Holford, was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II.

OTD in 1973: London Bridge
1973

Pink Floyd’s “The Dark Side of the Moon” debuted on the Billboard’s Top 200 chart.

The album spent 736 weeks on Billboard's Top 200 chart, making it one of the most successful albums of all time.
1968

The Bee Gees made their first appearance on TV performing “Words” and “To Love Somebody” on the Ed Sullivan Show.

1958

NASA launched the Vanguard I satellite.

It was only the second US satellite to go into Earth's orbit and successfully measured the shape of our planet.
1908

The quickest boxing match in history took place.

Tommy Burns defeated Jem Roche in just 88 seconds.
1905

Albert Einstein wrote his first paper on the Quantum Theory of Light.

OTD in 1905: Albert Einstein wrote his first paper on the Quantum Theory of Light.
This theory would become a cornerstone of modern physics.
Source JSTOR
1762

New York City held the world’s first St Patrick’s Day Parade.

The celebration still happens today with around 2 million spectators.
432

Saint Patrick was captured by Irish raiders from his home in Britain and taken to be a slave in Ireland.